In the Works! April 2014

Newsletter

Check out our latest newsletter, In the Works!, for all the goings on at Goodwill!

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19 Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful

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  • You have to make the call you’re afraid to make.
  • You have to get up earlier than you want to get up.
  • You have to give more than you get in return right away.
  • You have to care more about others than they care about you.
  • You have to fight when you are already injured, bloody, and sore.
  • You have to feel unsure and insecure when playing it safe seems smarter.
  • You have to lead when no one else is following you yet.
  • You have to invest in yourself even though no one else is.
  • You have to look like a fool while you’re looking for answers you don’t have.
  • You have to grind out the details when it’s easier to shrug them off.
  • You have to deliver results when making excuses is an option.
  • You have to search for your own explanations even when you’re told to accept the “facts.”
  • You have to make mistakes and look like an idiot.
  • You have to try, fail and try again.
  • You have to run faster even though you’re out of breath.
  • You have to be kind to people who have been cruel to you.
  • You have to meet deadlines that are unreasonable and deliver results that are unparalleled.
  • You have to be accountable for your actions even when things go wrong.
  • You have to keep moving towards where you want to be no matter what’s in front of you.

You have to do the hard things. The things that no one else is doing. The things that scare you. The things that make you wonder how much longer you can hold on.

Those are the things that define you. Those are the things that make the difference between living a life of mediocrity or outrageous success.

The hard things are the easiest things to avoid. To excuse away. To pretend like they don’t apply to you.

The simple truth about how ordinary people accomplish outrageous feats of success is that they do the hard things that smarter, wealthier, more qualified people don’t have the courage — or desperation — to do.

Do the hard things. You might be surprised at how amazing you really are.

cross posted from luthas.com

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Dress for Success for Less

DC BAC Dress for Sucess flyer

 

Want to see what to wear and what not to wear?  Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina’s Davidson County Business Advisory Council will be hosting “Dress for Success for Less” on Wednesday, April, 2nd from 11:00 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.  This event includes a fashion show to make the public aware of the type of attire most suitable for job interviews and work settings, as well as the availability of the items at Goodwill stores.

In addition, employers and community partners will be on site to advise those in attendance how to navigate a job search and a successful job interview based on a set of criteria.  Corporate representatives scheduled to participate include:

•      Atrium

•      Temporary Resources

•      Lowes Hardware

•      The ARC of Davidson County

•      Carolina House

•      Goodwill Retail Store

•      Manpower Staffing, and

•      Lexington Parks & Recreation

A light lunch will be served, and door prizes awarded.  The event is free and open to the public.

For more information call Rhonda Wagner at (336) 236-8020.

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Hey Guys, Here’s how to go about wearing a suit

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If you don’t wear suits all the time, knowing all the little style rules you need to follow is a daunting task. Many of them are unspoken, and you’re only clued into them if you’re an expert, so we took some time to round up the most important suit rules and put them in a simple, condensed cheat sheet that you can easily refer to whenever you find yourself neck-deep in a three-piece.

LEVEL I: THE BASICS

♦ Your belt should be fairly thin and the same color as your shoes
♦ Your tie should always be darker than your dress shirt
♦ Your tie bar should never be wider than your tie
♦ Never fasten the bottom button of a double-breasted jacket (unless it has only a single row of buttons)
♦ If you’re wearing a vest, always keep the bottom button unbuttoned
♦ Always unbutton your suit before sitting down, or you risk ruining it
♦ Save yourself some embarrassment: Always remove the stitching on the vents and the label on the left sleeve before wearing a new suit

LEVEL II: FINER POINTS

♦ The width of the tie should match the width of the lapel
♦ Your tie should just reach the waistband of your trousers, or be slightly shorter
♦ The suit jacket should be just long enough to cover your pants zipper and butt
♦ The top button of a two-button (or the middle button of a three-button) should fall at or above the navel
♦ Sleeve cuffs should be exposed about half an inch
♦ Make sure that your socks are long enough that there’s no exposed leg when sitting down
♦ You should match your shoes to the color of your suit using this guide

LEVEL III: STYLE SAVVY

♦ A pocket square adds an extra level of polish, but make sure it doesn’t match your tie in either pattern or fabric choice
♦ In general, thin lapels are more modern, whereas wide lapels are more old-school
♦ Opt for a charcoal or gray suit over black, unless you’re attending a funeral
♦ For a more fashion-forward look, the pant hem should hit right at the top of your shoe
♦ When you go without a tie, it’s best to keep your shirt collar on the smaller side
♦ Double vents in the back are more modern and fashionable
♦ Avoid over-accessorizing. If you’re already wearing a pocket square and a tie bar, you’ll want to reconsider that clever lapel pin.

LEVEL IV: SHOPPING SMART

♦ Choose fabric according to how often you’ll wear the suit. The most versatile option is a soft but durable wool like super 120 (a measure of yarn fineness; any higher is too delicate for daily use)
♦ When buying an off-the-rack suit, the number one thing to check is how the shoulders fit
♦ A collar gap between your jacket’s lapels and your shirt’s collar can signify an ill-fitting jacket
♦ If you’re going for more formal business attire, opt for a double-button, notched lapel jacket
♦ For a more casual, trendy look, opt for a single-button peak-lapel jacket
♦ You should be able to slip your hand between your chest and your buttoned jacket such that it feels snug, but with room to move
♦ Visible stitches around the edges of your lapels (called pick-stitching) aren’t necessarily a sign of a well-made garment anymore. However, they can be an attractive decorative flourish—as long as they’re subtle. No contrast stitching!

cross posted from The Manual

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A Guide to Perfecting Your Resume

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You know that you should edit your resume before you send it off in the world, making sure it’s error-free.  But to make sure that resume is in the best possible shape? You should really take the editing process a few steps further.  Here’s the thing: Editing is more than just giving something a once-over to eliminate egregious typos and grammar mistakes. It’s really about looking at something with a critical eye, then making changes to ensure it’s the best it can possibly be.  And that’s what you want for your resume, right? From someone who edits all day, every day for a living, here’s a five-step editing plan that will take your resume from good to full-blown awesome (and—of course—eliminate the typos, too).

 Step 1: Consider the Big Picture

When I look at an article for the first time, I have to resist the urge to fix typos or make style changes (and believe me, as an editor, it’s hard). But it’s important—the first thing I need to determine is whether the piece is working as a whole. Is this right for our publication? Is the message of the article the one we want to send? Are there any major gaps or sections that are superfluous?  On that first read of your resume, try to do the same thing. Ignore typos or formatting issues, and think about the overall message your resume is sending:

  • Does this sell you as the perfect candidate for the types of roles you’re seeking?
  • Are there any gaps between the experience on the page and the experience required for the job?
  • If so, are there ways in which you could bridge those gaps?
  • What makes your experience stand out among other, similar candidates?
  • Does the top third of your resume serve as a hook to get the hiring manager to read more?
  • Is there anything on your resume that doesn’t need to be there?

Pro Tip: Look at the LinkedIn profiles of people at your level in your field, and see how they tell their stories. Which ones are most compelling or stand out the most? See what you can learn from them and how you can apply those lessons to your own resume.

Step 2: Scrutinize the Bullets and Details

As editors, we ask constantly ask ourselves if each word is the best one, if a sentence structure is right, if there’s anything that could be said more clearly, effectively, or quickly. And oh, do we add examples! Why say something if you can show it? It makes for better writing and a more interesting read.  Walk through your resume again. Your job at this point is to look at every section, every sentence, and every word, and determine if there’s a better way to get your point across. For each bullet point, ask:

  • Is this the strongest possible language you could use?
  • Can anything be said more clearly? Or in fewer words?
  • Is there any language that someone outside of your company or industry wouldn’t understand?
  • Could anything benefit from examples?
  • Can anything be quantified? Can you show a benefit?
  • Are any words used over and over? Can they be replaced with more creative language?

Pro Tip: Have a friend who’s not in your field read your bullet points, and ask what he or she thinks your strongest achievements are. Do you agree? If not, adjust so the most important ones really stand out.

Step 3: Fact Check

Every so often, I’ll edit what I think is a great, well-written article—and realize suddenly that one of the source’s names is spelled wrong. I’ll take a closer look and see that—wait—a book title is incorrect, research numbers are not quite right, and that other “facts” in the article need a second look.  It’s a good idea to do this for your resume, too. It can happen even with the right intentions—I, for example, recently realized that my resume said “3 million” on a figure that most certainly should have been 1 million. Whoops.  Read every word on your resume again, this time asking yourself:

  • Are the companies you worked for named the same thing? Still located in the same city?
  • Are your position titles accurate?
  • Are your employment dates correct?
  • Are all of the numbers and percentages you use to describe increases, quotas, budgets, savings, and achievements (reasonably) accurate?

Pro Tip: In the editorial world, we have to make sure every number we print is 100% accurate, but you have a bit more leeway with your resume. As long as you’re reasonably sure that you increased customer satisfaction, fundraising numbers, or sales 25%, don’t worry about having the “official” numbers to prove it.

Step 4: Proofread

As I well know, you can work intently on a document for three hours and somehow not notice that you’ve used “their” instead of “there” or mistaken “bran” for “brand.” So, proofreading one last time is a step you can’t skip. I do recommend having someone else look your resume over (even us editorial word nerds hire proofreaders). But before you do, proof word by word, asking yourself:

  • Are there any typos? Wrong word usage?
  • Does each bullet point end with a period (or not)? Either is fine, just be consistent.
  • Are you using the serial comma (or not) throughout?

Pro Tip: When proofreading, it’s helpful to temporarily change the font, or to read your resume from the bottom up—your eyes get used to reading a page one way, and can often catch new errors when you mix the format up.

 Step 5: Make Sure it Looks Nice

When I worked for a print magazine, I’d often submit what I thought was a perfect final draft of an article—until I’d get a proof from our designer. More often than not, my masterpiece would need some adjustments to look right on the page: shortening the copy so that it didn’t require a miniature-sized font, or lengthening a paragraph so that one word didn’t hang over on a line by itself, for example. Because part of great writing is making it look great, too.  While you don’t have to send your resume off to a graphic designer, do keep in mind that presentation is important, and that a few adjustments to your text can make a big difference in how it looks. Give it a final once-over with a designer’s eye, considering:

  • Does the page look visually appealing?
  • Is the page overly cluttered?
  • Is the font size too small? Is it difficult to read?
  • Is the font size and format for each section consistent?
  • Does the layout make sense?
  • Is your contact information easily findable?

Pro Tip: Make your document easier to skim by adding divider lines between sections. Check out section three of this great guide to resume formatting from LifeClever for instructions.

As a final note, I recommend editing your resume again and again—adding in your new accomplishments, shifting the way you talk about an experience based on something you’ve seen someone else do, and making sure there’s nothing you’ve missed. After all, as any writer or editor will tell you: The best masterpieces are never done.

cross posted from thedailymuse.com

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Seven Things You Shouldn’t Say During An Interview

Job-Interview

Chances are that you have said something you wish you could take back at least once in your life. While suffering from a sudden case of foot-in-mouth disease can be merely embarrassing in most instances, it can all but ruin your chances of getting a job when it happens during an interview.

Job seekers often focus on saying the right thing and while that is important, saying the wrong thing should also be avoided. A poorly-timed faux pas can be so damaging that it could force a hiring manager to overlook all the good things you did up to that point. Not all mistakes are created equal, of course, which is something that Kaitlin Madden was sure to point out in a recent article on CareerBuilder.com. In the piece, she listed the seven things you should never say during an interview under any circumstances:

  • “My last boss was an idiot.”
  • A stream of one-word answers.
  • Your opinions on politics, religion, or other hot-button topics.
  • “Of course I know [skill you actually don't know but are saying anyway to increase your chances of getting hired]!”
  • “Want to get a drink or a bite to eat after this is done?”
  • Laughing hysterically at a joke the interviewer tells. It’s fine to chuckle, but don’t overdo it.
  • “I’m not THAT great.” Modesty is accepted in most walks of life but not in the world of interviews. Don’t be afraid to sell yourself.

 

cross posted from thenonprofittimes.com

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Word Choices For Your Resume

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On average, a hiring manager will look over a resume for only six seconds, and if they don’t see something that stands out, you may not end up landing an interview. Knowing this fact can add even more stress to the job search process, but don’t let it. Resume writing is easier than you think. Writing a precise resume is key to securing a job, so it’s important to pack the right words in your resume to showcase your skills and abilities. Your resume doesn’t need to tell your life story, but it does need to get the hiring manager’s attention.

Resume Word Choices
It’s important to use words in present tense when writing about your current job and use past tense when referring to a previous job. Employers aren’t only looking for skills, but also certifications, degrees, job titles, and company names. They are also looking for keywords that highlight your experience, personality, and abilities. Some of these keywords include:

Information-related

  • Administered
  • Analyzed
  • Compared
  • Compiled
  • Gathered
  • Organized
  • Prepared
  • Recorded
  • Researched

People-related

  • Coached
  • Coordinated
  • Consulted
  • Evaluated
  • Instructed
  • Managed
  • Negotiated
  • Persuaded
  • Scheduled

Objects/Material-related

  • Arranged
  • Assembled
  • Created
  • Inspected
  • Maintained
  • Operated
  • Repaired
  • Sold
  • Tested

Be careful not to be repetitive in your word usage. You can easily spice up your resume to convey similar actions by using different words. What are some keywords you’ve used in your resume? Share with us in the comments section below!

cross posted from blog.expresspros.com

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